Some Observations of the Thai Classroom #4 – The Know-it-all.

Hermione-Granger-Hand-Raise-GIF

The Know-it-all can come in two breeds; the cute and enthusiastic or the ‘you are not worthy of my knowledge’ type.  I guess you can tell which one is more annoying to have in your class.

Ask any question, pose any lexical conundrum to the class, and this student will shout out the answer before their classmates have had the chance to comprehend what is being asked of them.  “Raise your hands, please”; the teacher tries to maintain some level of control over the Know-it-all’s outbursts, only to find that they are the only kid to sit, straining their arm above their head, fingers waggling in excited anticipation of being correct, once again.

Fellow students groan at their never ending knowledge.  Teachers try their hardest to direct questions away from them.  “Anyone other than [insert name of Know-it-all] like to give it a go? … No?”  Their position as lead in answering questions and always being the first to finish is firmly set in place.  It becomes the teacher’s objective to not only congratulate the clever child, but to keep them grounded and try to let the other students try for themselves.

Maybe they are naturally good at languages.  Maybe they are extremely studious.  Perhaps their parents can’t afford to put them on a higher level of academic programme.  Private lessons on evenings and weekends often have a part to play.

Extra work is brought to class by the teacher, their key objective of occupy the Know-it-all put into action.  A premature “Teacher, finished!” is met with yet another worksheet, each increasing in difficulty.  Maybe this one will be the one to break the know it all.

The teacher lives for the day when the Know-it-all is stumped by something.  Not that we like to see the students fail, but just for them to be challenged by something and for their classmates to see that the Know-it-all can sometimes get stuck too – they really are human after all.

Do you have a Know-it-all in one of your classes?  How do you keep them occupied and control their ever-raising hand?

This is part of a series of ‘Some Observations of the Thai Classroom’ posts.  See below for my previous entries.

Some Observations of the Thai Classroom #1 – The Buffalo Boy

Some Observations of the Thai Classroom #2 – Keen Bean

Some Observations of the Thai Classroom #3 – The Monkey Boys

 

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Some observations of the Thai Classroom #1 – The Buffalo Boy

The average class in a government school in Thailand, studying a regular, no-added-extras programme of education will usually have a cohort of around fifty students. Unfortunately it is very unlikely that you will ever learn even a fraction of the nicknames of these students (don’t even try to attempt to learn their five syllable full names!) and those that you do learn will be of the naughty students – it helps to be able to directly address a student when they are acting up – “Oi! You!” just doesn’t help to get their attention while they are running around the back of the classroom brandishing a broom/chair/desk/cat/fellow student (yes, these things have all happened.)

Despite not knowing the names of all of these students you will develop a sense of getting to know them, both in the sense of the group dynamic of that particular class group; the ‘hyper’ class, the ‘boring’ class, the ‘good’ class; and as individuals. I have found that there are a set of different categories that each student tends to fall into, feeding on a range of influences including attitude, behaviour, appearance and even where they choose to sit. Based on my own experiences over the past year as a TEFL teacher, five years working with young people in the UK and the quickly fading memories of studying group dynamics and experiential learning at university, I have drawn some observations of the typical students you will find in each and every class. I was going to put them all into one mammoth post but to save your eyes, minds and time I will give it to you bit by bit. Starting with one of my favourites; The Buffalo Boy.

 

The Buffalo Boy

In Thailand the buffalo is associated with stupidity and slowness. Daily we see men walking their buffalo along the road, leading them from field to field, where they will munch on grass and swat flies with their tails. We aren’t talking majestic fighting buffalo here – just the plain old, slightly muddy, pooing in the road type of buffalo.

The name may be specific to Thailand but each group needs it’s Buffalo Boy – if you can’t think of one when you look back at your classes at school then unfortunately you were it. I refer to this character as The Buffalo Boy as it will almost always be a boy, he will be overweight (not in a big boned way but a poor lifestyle, too much crappy food and no exercise way) and will usually carry a slightly lost, gormless look on his face (look at any image of a real buffalo for a pretty good representation of this expression). Communication is reduced to caveman style grunts, punches and other random, laboured movements that sometimes fool you into thinking he may be about to participate but he is actually only shifting from left to right bum cheek.

He will usually sit middle left – just in front of the monkey boys that reside in back left as he doesn’t quite have the energy to be fully part of that pack. He can be easily led by them and often any loutish behaviour from him is inspired by their whisperings and suggestions. He is also often the scapegoat of the class, with blame being thrust at him from all surrounding corners of the classroom. A middle seat is pretty middle-of-the-road though, and he chooses this neutral ground because really he isn’t choosing to be The Buffalo Boy, and so it isn’t an attention thing – he would rather sit and disappear into the crowd.

I love to get The Buffalo Boy up to the front as much as possible. When pushed, he is able to join in and the whole class will cheer every time he utters a word in English. It also gives me a chance to actually hear him speak and to check that he is kind of maybe following what is going on. He may even crack a smile. Most of the time the case is that he isn’t completely stupid, he just doesn’t have the energy, enthusiasm or get up and go to join in at will. With a little persuasion he can fly! OK, scrap that – have you ever seen a buffalo fly? He can at least plod along.

wild buffalo looking stupid

Image source: www.byronandemma.blogspot.com

 

Do you have a Buffalo Boy in your classroom?

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